Hunting Michigan Coyotes

What a hunter should know before heading out to hunt predators

Two+coyotes+taken+by+Grand+Ledge+local%2C+Clint+Taylor.+Taylor+normally+hunts+during+the+night+hours.
Back to Article
Back to Article

Hunting Michigan Coyotes

Two coyotes taken by Grand Ledge local, Clint Taylor. Taylor normally hunts during the night hours.

Two coyotes taken by Grand Ledge local, Clint Taylor. Taylor normally hunts during the night hours.

Photo by Clint Taylor/Courtesy Photo

Two coyotes taken by Grand Ledge local, Clint Taylor. Taylor normally hunts during the night hours.

Photo by Clint Taylor/Courtesy Photo

Photo by Clint Taylor/Courtesy Photo

Two coyotes taken by Grand Ledge local, Clint Taylor. Taylor normally hunts during the night hours.

Jonathan Callison, Copy Editor/Graphic Designer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






   Nature always takes care of itself. However, there are instances when nature could use some assistance.

   The wildlife and the environment are part of one another, but one can overpower the other. Here in Michigan, the predator population has been growing, specifically wolves and coyotes. Wolves are in the U.P. and are illegal to hunt. As for coyotes, they are good for the taking.

   Coyotes are a nuisance predator. They feast on animals of all shapes and sizes, such as deer, turkeys, livestock, and small game. Coyotes can also feast on domestic animals like cats and dogs. According to the MI Department of Natural Resources, coyote hunting is permitted throughout the state and there is no bag limit. Coyotes doing or about to do damage to private property on private land may be taken by the owner or designee without a license year-round. Other rules are that residents may hunt coyotes with a base license, except between Nov. 10 – 14, when residents must have a fur harvester license and are limited to the use of a .22 or smaller rimfire. Non-residents must have a fur harvester license to hunt and trap coyotes. As for rules on equipment, Centerfire rifles may be used to hunt coyotes during regular daytime hunting hours statewide. Centerfire rifles or pistols .269 caliber or smaller are allowed to be used at night. The exception is that Centerfire rifles and pistols may not be used in state parks, recreation areas statewide, or on any public land in the Limited Firearms Deer Zone. Electronic calls, mouth calls, or other types of game or predator calls may be used. For additional information on rules and regulations, check out the current copy of the Michigan Hunting Digest at your local license dealer.

   Hunting coyotes is not only a fun, bone chilling, and addictive, it is also important. By hunting coyotes, the hunter is helping out the ecosystem by keeping it balanced.

   “I’ve been actively hunting them for 4-5 years,” GL hunter and Owner of A to Z Game Calls, Clint Taylors, said. “I personally think it’s very important to hunt these apex predators because they have nothing around here to keep them in check. They are very smart and good at what they do, and for me personally, [in] the properties I have hunted awhile, I notice more wildlife flourish. I have gotten between 130-150 coyotes in the last couple of years.”

   There are many different ways to hunt coyotes. There are both daytime and nighttime hunting. During the daytime, a hunter can use their current rifle setup, if the caliber is within the regulations, and go and hunt on private property of their own, or get permission from a landowner to hunt on their property. During night hunts, one should equip their rifle with a night vision or thermal sight. As for the call, a hunter should place the call nearest to them or out in front. Before hunting coyotes at all, the hunter should check out the hunting property first to figure out where to hunt from depending on wind direction and how to get to that spot. Knowing where the coyotes are on the property is also important. One should use an electronic call or a handheld call to see where the coyotes are located. Hunters should also go out with another person. That way the hunter increases the chances of harvesting a coyote, because another hunter can either be a spotter or be on another rifle to help take down more coyotes and having another person come along is a safer way to hunt.

    One cannot go hunting for coyotes without a call. One should choose the call that is easiest for them. An electronic call is pretty simple to use; just follow the instructions that came with the call. As for hand held calls, those take time to learn how to use. Making game calls also provides a sense of accomplishment, just ask Clint Taylor.

   “I always wanted to make something myself that I could have a successful hunt with as kind of a challenge to myself,” Taylor said. “Before I knew it, I had people wanting to buy them because they liked the calls and how they sounded. I find a lot of joy in making a call for someone that has a successful hunt with one of my calls and the idea they can pass it down. Plus all the woods I use are rare and exotic, so something a lot of people would have never seen before.”

   Hunting for coyotes is an adrenaline game. For hunters, it provides a rush like none other in the hunting world. Remember to be safe and know where and when to hunt these predators. Go out and give it a try. For more info, check out A-Z Game Calls by going to their Facebook page.